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Stool, Box, Prototyp, 2004–2006
Big-Game
Stool, Box, Prototyp,
Big-Game,

Stool, Box, Prototyp,
2004–2006

Big-Game
*2035
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[{"lat":47.382980506086554,"lng":8.53594016567611},{"floor":"floorplan-ug"}]
BF
GF
1
2
2
Museum für Gestaltung Zürich
Ausstellungsstrasse 60
8031 Zurich
Museum map
Museum für Gestaltung Zürich
Toni-Areal, Pfingstweidstrasse 94
8031 Zurich
  • Box, Prototyp Big-Game Stool
  • Box, Prototyp Big-Game Stool
  • Box, Prototyp Big-Game Stool
  • Box, Prototyp Big-Game Stool
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CH-2006-1030_EN.mp3
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Designer trio Big-Game has been creating furniture ensembles, lighting, and utensils since 2004. For its Pack Sweet Pack collection, it transposed functional and formal elements from the packaging industry to traditional furniture.

Augustin Scott de Martinville (b. 1980), Elric Petit (b. 1978), and Grégoire Jeanmonod (b. 1978) met in 2004 at the École cantonale d’art de Lausanne. In 2006, along with Adrien Rovero (b. 1981), they presented their second furniture collection at the Milan Furniture Fair—just one year after their debut collection Heritage in Progress. Featuring a rug, vases, pendant lamps, mirrors, stools, and a tetrahedron-shaped armchair, Pack Sweet Pack confronts domestic living space with the packaging industry. Although in formal terms the Box stool, in folded aluminum with an inset handle, recalls Le Corbusier’s Tabouret from 1959, its structure and color scheme unmistakably reference its source of inspiration: a folded cardboard box.
As well as juxtaposing two distinctive design areas, the collection takes a playful approach to symbols—as signaled by the name of the Lausanne-based design collective. This radical approach, which runs counter to furniture-industry conventions, has played a significant part in the success of the now well-established design studio. (Sabina Tenti and Renate Menzi)

Hocker, Box, Prototyp, 2004–2006
Entwurf: Big-Game / Grégoire Jeanmonod, Elric Petit, Augustin Scott de Martinville; in Zusammenarbeit mit Adrien Rovero
Herstellung: Big-Game, Lausanne, CH
Material/Technik: Aluminium, thermolackiert
40 × 30 × 24 cm
Dauerleihgabe: Schweizerische Eidgenossenschaft, Bundesamt für Kultur Bern
Literatureo

Big-Game, Big-Game. Design Overview, Oostkamp 2008.

Museum für Gestaltung Zürich (Hg.), 100 Jahre Schweizer Design, Zürich 2014, S. 347.

www.big-game.ch

 Anniina Koivu und Susanne Hilpert Stuber, Big-Game: Everyday Objects. Industrial Design Works, Ausst.-Kat. mudac, Lausanne, Zürich 2019.

Image creditso

Hocker, Box, Prototyp, 2004–2006, Entwurf: Big-Game in Zusammenarbeit mit Adrien Rovero, Dauerleihgabe: Schweizerische Eidgenossenschaft, Bundesamt für Kultur Bern
Abbildung: Museum für Gestaltung Zürich / ZHdK

Hocker, Tabouret, 1959, Entwurf: Le Corbusier, Donation: Arthur Rüegg
Abbildung: Museum für Gestaltung Zürich / ZHdK

Gruppenbild von Big-Game und Adrien Rovero mit der Serie Pack Sweet Pack, 2006, Entwurf: Big-Game / Grégoire Jeanmonod, Elric Petit, Augustin Scott de Martinville
Abbildung: Big-Game / Fotografie: Milo Keller

Vase, Fragile, Prototyp, 2004–2006, Entwurf: Big-Game / Grégoire Jeanmonod, Elric Petit, Augustin Scott de Martinville
Abbildung: Museum für Gestaltung Zürich / ZHdK

Hocker, Tetra, 2004–2006, Entwurf: Big-Game / Grégoire Jeanmonod, Elric Petit, Augustin Scott de Martinville
Abbildung: Museum für Gestaltung Zürich / ZHdK