This is the eGuide number for the object. You can find it next to selected objects in the exhibition.
This is the location number for the object.
Click here to go to the main menu.
Click here to change languages.
Click here to change the font size and log in.
Click here to show the location of the object.
Zoom with two fingers and rotate images 360° with one finger. Swipe an object to the side to see the next one.
Click here for background information, biographies, legends, etc.
Click here to listen to spoken texts or audio files.
Share an object.
Download as PDF.
Add to saved objects.
 
Poster, Dylan, 1966
Milton Glaser
Poster, Dylan
Milton Glaser,

Poster, Dylan,
1966

Milton Glaser
*4013
g
f Object e
[{"lat":47.383180731748574,"lng":8.53607394085077},{"floor":"floorplan-2"}]
BF
GF
1
2
2
Museum für Gestaltung Zürich
Ausstellungsstrasse 60
8031 Zurich
Museum map
Museum für Gestaltung Zürich
Toni-Areal, Pfingstweidstrasse 94
8031 Zurich
  • Dylan Milton Glaser Poster
  • Dylan Milton Glaser Poster
6
7
Listen to the text
j

The Dylan poster by Milton Glaser (b. 1929) adorned countless dorm rooms and record stores throughout the world in the late 1960s. It was included as an insert in the sleeve of Dylan’s 1967 album Bob Dylan’s Greatest Hits. Although Dylan hated the album and afterward left Columbia Records, Glaser’s poster continued to enjoy an illustrious career in museum collections.

The fine-lined yet striking profile of the enigmatic singer-songwriter is captured here as a mere silhouette. The black face is set off against a magnificent head of multicolored hair. With his head bowed, Dylan, who was already a star at the time, gives the impression of being withdrawn and absorbed in thought. Milton Glaser drew inspiration for his iconic poster from a silhouette self-portrait by Marcel Duchamp (1887–1968), who at the time had a studio next door to his in the same New York building. The brightly colored waves of hair, which stand in sharp contrast to the face, show the influence of Glaser’s engagement with Islamic decorative arts. And his Babyteeth typeface, which is perhaps used most prominently in this poster, was modeled on a sign he saw in Mexico. These disparate influences, brought together here intuitively, are characteristic of Glaser’s graphic design, which derives its appeal from a lighthearted whimsy coupled with visual variety and poetic wit. Glaser and his colleagues at New York’s Push Pin Studio thus took a stance against the objective rigor of Swiss Style, the then dominant force in the United States. The numerous citations of Glaser’s poster reveal how it inscribed itself into the collective visual memory. André Broussard (b. 1984), for example, took it as a template for a poster he did for a group in Lafayette, Louisiana, supporting Bernie Sanders’s (b. 1941) US presidential campaign. (Bettina Richter)

Plakat, Dylan, 1966
Erscheinungsland: USA
Gestaltung: Milton Glaser
Auftrag: Columbia Records, US
Material/Technik: Offset
83 x 56.5 cm
Eigentum: Museum für Gestaltung Zürich / ZHdK
Literatureo

Museum für Kunst und Gewerbe (Hg.), Plakatkunst von Toulouse-Lautrec bis Benetton, Köln 1995, S. 184, 185

www.rightearleft.com

Image creditso

Plakat, Dylan, 1966, USA, Gestaltung: Milton Glaser
Abbildung: Museum für Gestaltung Zürich / ZHdK

Zeichnung, Selbstporträt im Profil, 1957, Künstler: Marcel Duchamp
Abbildung: The Metropolitan Museum of Art, The Met, New York, US

Plakat, Bernie, 2016, USA, Gestaltung: André Broussard, Donation: Susanne Giezendanner
Abbildung: Museum für Gestaltung Zürich / ZHdK