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Poster, Nunc est bibendum – Le pneu Michelin boit l'obstacle, ca. 1900
O'Galop (Marius Rossillon)
Poster, Nunc est bibendum – Le pneu Michelin boit l'obstacle
O'Galop (Marius Rossillon),

Poster, Nunc est bibendum – Le pneu Michelin boit l'obstacle,
ca. 1900

O'Galop (Marius Rossillon)
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Museum für Gestaltung Zürich
Ausstellungsstrasse 60
8031 Zurich
Museum map
Museum für Gestaltung Zürich
Toni-Areal, Pfingstweidstrasse 94
8031 Zurich
  • Nunc est bibendum – Le pneu Michelin boit l'obstacle O'Galop (Marius Rossillon) Poster
  • Nunc est bibendum – Le pneu Michelin boit l'obstacle O'Galop (Marius Rossillon) Poster
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Listen to the text
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The Michelin Man, also known as Bibendum, is one of the world’s most famous and long-lived brand ambassadors. Although according to an anecdote it was the company’s founders, the brothers André (1853–1931) and Édouard Michelin (1859–1940), who came up with idea for the original mascot, it is nonetheless astounding that the actual creator of Bibendum, O’Galop (1869–1946), is little-known today.

The Michelin brothers got the idea for their trademark figure from a stack of tires they spotted at the 1894 International Exposition in Lyon, simply adding arms and legs. They remembered the Latin toast Nunc est bibendum (Let us drink) from a poster showing a stout Bavarian raising a glass of beer. In the graphic artist O’Galop, who at the time was working mainly as a caricaturist for several satirical magazines, they found the right collaborator to put their ideas into concrete form. That O’Galop would later go on to become an animation pioneer is hardly surprising in view of his successful pictorial translation of the Michelin brothers’ idea. He created the first poster in 1898, with variations produced slightly later: Bibendum toasts us with a glass of shards, while nails and other metal objects are strewn across the table before him. The slogan “The Michelin tire swallows every obstacle” explains the message behind the depiction. His tablemates embodying Michelin’s main rivals, Continental and Dunlop, look on with somber expressions. They look pathetically flat next to the plump Bibendum, as all the air has escaped out of them. In later years, the Michelin Man was modified several times, lost some weight, and was soon made up of twenty-six tires instead of forty. He also had to give up his beloved cigar with the advent of anti-smoking campaigns. Bibendum has survived until today, however, probably due to his adaptability. (Bettina Richter)

Plakat, Nunc est bibendum – Le pneu Michelin boit l'obstacle, um 1900
Erscheinungsland: Frankreich
Gestaltung: O'Galop (Marius Rossillon)
Auftrag: Michelin, Clermont-Ferrand, FR
Material/Technik: Lithografie
163 x 125 cm
Eigentum: Museum für Gestaltung Zürich / ZHdK
Image creditso

Plakat, Nunc est bibendum – Le pneu Michelin boit l'obstacle, um 1900, Frankreich, Gestaltung: O'Galop (Marius Rossillon)
Abbildung: Museum für Gestaltung Zürich / ZHdK

Plakat, Le meilleur – Le moins cher – Pneu Vélo Michelin, um 1900, Frankreich, Gestaltung: O'Galop (Marius Rossillon)
Abbildung: Museum für Gestaltung Zürich / ZHdK

Werbefigur (Grundentwurf), Bibendum,1898, Gestaltung: O'Galop (Marius Rossillon), Produktion: Michelin, Clermont-Ferrand, FR
Abbildung: Museum für Gestaltung Zürich / ZHdK