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Folding table, Move it, Prototyp, 1995
Alfredo HäberliChristophe Marchand
Folding table, Move it, Prototyp
Alfredo Häberli, Christophe Marchand,

Folding table, Move it, Prototyp,
1995

Alfredo HäberliChristophe Marchand
*2022
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Museum für Gestaltung Zürich
Ausstellungsstrasse 60
8031 Zurich
Museum map
Museum für Gestaltung Zürich
Toni-Areal, Pfingstweidstrasse 94
8031 Zurich
  • Move it, Prototyp Alfredo Häberli Christophe Marchand Folding table
  • Move it, Prototyp Alfredo Häberli Christophe Marchand Folding table
  • Move it, Prototyp Alfredo Häberli Christophe Marchand Folding table
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Listen to the text
Interview mit Alfredo Häberli
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Soon after completing their studies at the Schule für Gestaltung Zürich, Alfredo Häberli (b. 1964) and Christophe Marchand (b. 1965) designed an ingenious foldable table in the spirit of Swiss tubular steel modernism. It is easy to move and can be combined with other tables, which fit inside each other for easy storage.

After studying at the Schule für Gestaltung Zürich, Alfredo Häberli and Christophe Marchand opened a studio for design and product development. Great admirers of the work of Bruno Munari, Enzo Mari, and Charles Eames, they designed useful items that could also have a touch of whimsy or wit, while lavishing attention on functional details. Häberli and Marchand had sought cooperation with international manufacturers early on. Through Heinz Ryffel (b. 1947) and his production and distribution company Sele2, they came into contact with Thonet, which was looking for a mobile table for temporary deployment. Move it, made of tubular steel and solid-core laminate, can be regarded as a tribute to the “Swiss tubular steel modernism” of the 1930s. Similar to the folding table by Werner Max Moser (1932), it can be conveniently stored by flipping up the tabletop. Move it thus solves the storage problem, but not with a foldable frame; instead, it holds the tabletop in a vertical position with a pneumatic spring so that several tables can fit inside each other to save space. The Aluflex chair by Armin Wirth (1903–1992) was the model for this telescoping storage system. The frame derives its stability from specially designed plastic clips. Available in five colors, the table offers space for four but can also easily be combined with other tables, making it suitable for both home use and public spaces. (Renate Menzi)

Klapptisch (Prototyp), Move it, 1995
Entwurf: Alfredo Häberli, Christophe Marchand
Herstellung: Gebrüder Thonet GmbH, Frankenberg, DE
Material/Technik: Vollkern-Schichtholz, belegt; Stahlrohr, pulverbeschichtet
74.5 × 80 × 80 cm
Dauerleihgabe: Schweizerische Eidgenossenschaft, Bundesamt für Kultur Bern
Literatureo

Museum für Gestaltung Zürich (Hg.), 100 Jahre Schweizer Design, Zürich 2014, S. 322.

Irene Meier, «Tisch ‹Move-it, 1996. Alfredo Häberli und Christophe Marchand›, 1996», in: Rüegg, Arthur (Hg.), Schweizer Möbel und Interieurs im 20. Jahrhundert, Basel/Boston/Berlin 2002, S. 292f.

Image creditso

Klapptisch (Prototyp), Move it, 1995, Entwurf: Alfredo Häberli, Christophe Marchand, Herstellung: Gebrüder Thonet GmbH, Frankenberg, DE, Dauerleihgabe: Schweizerische Eidgenossenschaft, Bundesamt für Kultur Bern

Klapptisch (Prototyp), Move it, 1995, Entwurf: Alfredo Häberli, Christophe Marchand, Herstellung: Gebrüder Thonet GmbH, Frankenberg, DE, Dauerleihgabe: Schweizerische Eidgenossenschaft, Bundesamt für Kultur Bern
Abbildung: Museum für Gestaltung Zürich / ZHdK

Fotografie aus Katalog, Ineinandergeschobene Klapptische Move it, um 1995, Auftrag: Gebrüder Thonet GmbH, Frankenberg, DE
Abbildung: Museum für Gestaltung Zürich / ZHdK

Modellreihe, Kunststoffklemmen Klapptisch Move it, um 1995, Entwurf: Alfredo Häberli, Christophe Marchand
Abbildung: Museum für Gestaltung Zürich / ZHdK