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Poster, Sinalco, 1970
Peter Emch
Poster, Sinalco,
Peter Emch,

Poster, Sinalco,
1970

Peter Emch
*4050
g
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BF
GF
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Museum für Gestaltung Zürich
Ausstellungsstrasse 60
8031 Zurich
Museum map
Museum für Gestaltung Zürich
Toni-Areal, Pfingstweidstrasse 94
8031 Zurich
  • Sinalco Peter Emch Poster
  • Sinalco Peter Emch Poster
  • Sinalco Peter Emch Poster
  • Sinalco Peter Emch Poster
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Pop artists addressed in their works the tightrope that is walked between fascination with and criticism of the commodity culture of the postwar era. They took their inspiration from everyday life and advertising. In the 1970s, elements of Pop Art again found their way back into product posters.

Sensuous red lips drawing from a straw are positioned above the dynamic lettering of the brand with the “i” replaced by a Sinalco bottle: with this stroke of advertising genius, the young graphic designer Peter Emch (b. 1945) would go down in poster history, only to devote himself entirely to art just a few years later. It was during his time as art director at Advico-Delpire that Sinalco had its heyday as a cult beverage.
The agency’s posters recall Roy Lichtenstein’s (1923–1997) legendary cartoon-like imagery. The glowing color combination of yellow and red as well as the raster dots are borrowed directly from the American painter, who imitated in his images the industrial printing techniques used for commercial products. At the same time, the raster also plays with Sinalco’s trademark red dot, which was introduced as far back as 1937. Emch succeeded in creating a poster that broke with conventional advertising aesthetics and paid homage to the zeitgeist with its overt eroticism. (Bettina Richter)

Plakat, Sinalco, 1970
Erscheinungsland: Schweiz
Gestaltung: Advico-Delpire AG / Peter Emch
Auftrag: Trank AG, Zürich, CH
Material / Technik: Siebdruck
127 × 90 cm
Eigentum: Museum für Gestaltung Zürich / ZHdK
Literatureo

Museum für Gestaltung Zürich, Bettina Richter (Hg.), Magie der Dinge, Poster Collection 24, Zürich 2012.

Argauer Kunsthaus Aarau (Hg.), Swiss Pop Art, Formen und Tendenzen 1962–1972, Zürich 2017.

Image creditso

Plakat, Sinalco, 1970, Schweiz, Gestaltung: Advico-Delpire AG / Peter Emch
Abbildung: Museum für Gestaltung Zürich / ZHdK

Plakat, Sinalco, 1972, Schweiz, Gestaltung: Advico-Delpire AG / Ruedi Külling
Abbildung: Museum für Gestaltung Zürich / ZHdK

Plakat, Sinalco, 1972, Schweiz, Gestaltung: Advico-Delpire AG / Ruedi Külling
Abbildung: Museum für Gestaltung Zürich / ZHdK

Plakat, Sinalco – c’est si bon !, 1961, Schweiz, Gestaltung: Victor N. Cohen AG / Ruedi Külling, Foto: René Groebli
Abbildung: Museum für Gestaltung Zürich / ZHdK

Plakat, Girl with Hair Ribbon, um 1965, USA, Gestaltung: Roy Lichtenstein
Abbildung: http://lichtensteinpaintings.com/girl-with-hair-ribbon/