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Folding table, Wohnbedarf Modell 42, 1931
Werner Max Moser
Folding table, Wohnbedarf Modell 42
Werner Max Moser,

Folding table, Wohnbedarf Modell 42,
1931

Werner Max Moser
*2008
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Museum für Gestaltung Zürich
Ausstellungsstrasse 60
8031 Zurich
Museum map
Museum für Gestaltung Zürich
Toni-Areal, Pfingstweidstrasse 94
8031 Zurich
  • Wohnbedarf Modell 42 Werner Max Moser Folding table
  • Wohnbedarf Modell 42 Werner Max Moser Folding table
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Listen to the text
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Small apartments call for lightweight, easily stowable furniture. Swiss architect Werner Max Moser’s (1896–1970) round folding table with its delicate tubular steel frame was designed especially for this always contemporary setting.

A key scene in Hans Richter’s 1930 Werkbund film Die neue Wohnung (New Living) features avant-garde Zurich designers dancing around a model apartment. The cupboards were built in to save space, the lightweight wooden furniture could be quickly pushed aside, and a low windowsill was even available as a seat. The living room could thus be effortlessly transformed into a party venue. When the designers of the Werkbund’s Neubühl housing development in Zurich set about planning their own range of metal furniture soon thereafter, transformability and multifunctionality became crucial focal points of the program. Werner Max Moser (1896–1970) presented his three-legged round folding table for the first time at the opening of the development in September 1931. Together with his wife, Silva, he illustrated a new style of living with his “work and living space for a journalist couple.” As the knickerbocker-clad man in Hans Finsler’s advertising photograph vividly demonstrates, the tubular steel frame of the small round table can be folded up with a simple movement and quickly set aside with its two panels in order to make room for festivities. The upper panel can also be used as a serving tray. By the end of 1930, Moser had already drafted a four-legged version of the table with a slightly larger diameter. Both models were a core part of the Wohnbedarf range from then on. The color-lacquered, “duralized,” or chrome-plated frame could be ordered with either linoleum-covered wood panels or—in its more elegant versions—with crystal or opaque glass. (Arthur Rüegg)

Klapptisch, Wohnbedarf Modell 42, 1931
Entwurf: Werner Max Moser
Herstellung: Embru-Werke AG, Rüti, CH
Produktion: Wohnbedarf AG, Zürich / Basel, CH
Material/Technik: Kristallglas, Marbrit; Stahlrohr, duralisiert
60 × 73.5 cm
Donation: Arthur Rüegg
Eigentum: Museum für Gestaltung Zürich / ZHdK
Literatureo

Museum für Gestaltung Zürich (Hg.), 100 Jahre Schweizer Design, Zürich 2014, S. 111.

Friederike Mehlau-Wiebking / Arthur Rüegg / Ruggero Tropeano, Schweizer Typenmöbel 1925–1935, Sigfried Giedion und die Wohnbedarf AG, Zürich 1989.

Arthur Rüegg / Ruggero Tropeano, «L’arredo svizzero 1925–1950», in: Domus, Nr. 737, April 1992, Heft 4, S. 238–253.

Image creditso

Klapptisch, Wohnbedarf Modell 42, 1931, Entwurf: Werner Max Moser, Donation: Arthur Rüegg
Abbildung: Museum für Gestaltung Zürich / ZHdK

Klapptisch, Wohnbedarf Modell 42, 1931, Entwurf: Werner Max Moser, Donation: Arthur Rüegg
Abbildung: Museum für Gestaltung Zürich / ZHdK

Fotos aus Katalog Wohnbedarf, 1932/33, Fotografie: Hans Finsler
Abbildung: Museum für Gestaltung Zürich / ZHdK