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Vase, La Mina, ca. 1936
Carlo Scarpa
Vase, La Mina
Carlo Scarpa,

Vase, La Mina,
ca. 1936

Carlo Scarpa
*1525
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Museum für Gestaltung Zürich
Ausstellungsstrasse 60
8031 Zurich
Museum map
Museum für Gestaltung Zürich
Toni-Areal, Pfingstweidstrasse 94
8031 Zurich
  • La Mina Carlo Scarpa Vase
  • La Mina Carlo Scarpa Vase
  • La Mina Carlo Scarpa Vase
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Listen to the text
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The Venetian architect Carlo Scarpa (1906–1978) played a special role in modernizing glass production in Murano, tirelessly studying glass in all its colors and forms for over twenty years, which ultimately enabled him to reinterpret it in innovative ways.

With his vase La Mina, the Venetian architect Carlo Scarpa created during the prewar depression years a jewel of glass art with an almost transcendent luminance. Scattered across a spherical jet-black vessel, Scarpa had thirty separately blown glass balls applied in harmonious distribution. The resulting bomb form owes its luster to the gold leaf laid over the prints, in some cases in several layers to create an impression of great depth. The glass “landmine” also betrays a kinship with the artist’s Corrosi series, produced from 1936 to 1938. Here, the glassblower sprinkled the extremely thick surfaces with a coat of acid-soaked sawdust, causing corrosion. To emphasize the contour lines of the glass objects, Scarpa almost always used opaque glass in his sleek and unembellished creations. Scarpa acquired a rich stock of technical knowledge in his post as artistic director for the glass manufacturer Cappellin & C., later Venini & C., from the mid-1920s until 1947, putting his knowledge into practice in cooperation with the masters to create numerous vessels. In his longstanding engagement with glass, he ignored the prevailing requirements for serial production and instead went in for seemingly impossible experiments. (Sabine Flaschberger)

Vase, Mina, um 1936
Entwurf: Carlo Scarpa
Herstellung: Venini & C. Vetri Soffiati Muranesi, Murano, IT
Material/Technik: Glas; Blattgoldeinlage
18 x 21 cm
Eigentum: Museum für Gestaltung Zürich / ZHdK
Literatureo

Marino Barovier, Carlo Scarpa – Venini 1932–1947, Venedig 2013.

Image creditso

Vase, Mina, um 1936, Entwurf: Carlo Scarpa
Abbildung: Museum für Gestaltung Zürich / ZHdK

Vase, 1940, Entwurf: Carlo Scarpa
Abbildung: Museum für Gestaltung Zürich / ZHdK

Schale, Murrine, 1940 (Ausführung: um 1970), Entwurf: Carlo Scarpa
Abbildung: Museum für Gestaltung Zürich / ZHdK

Vase, Battuto Bicolore, um 1940, Entwurf: Carlo Scarpa
Abbildung: Museum für Gestaltung Zürich / ZHdK