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Final artwork for perspectival logo, Sulzer, 1933
Anton Stankowski
Final artwork for perspectival logo, Sulzer
Anton Stankowski,

Final artwork for perspectival logo, Sulzer,
1933

Anton Stankowski
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Museum für Gestaltung Zürich
Ausstellungsstrasse 60
8031 Zurich
Museum map
Museum für Gestaltung Zürich
Toni-Areal, Pfingstweidstrasse 94
8031 Zurich
  • Sulzer Anton Stankowski Final artwork for perspectival logo
  • Sulzer Anton Stankowski Final artwork for perspectival logo
  • Sulzer Anton Stankowski Final artwork for perspectival logo
  • Sulzer Anton Stankowski Final artwork for perspectival logo
  • Sulzer Anton Stankowski Final artwork for perspectival logo
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The perspectival Sulzer wordmark, which passes by like a cumulus cloud and represents the symbol for pure air, is probably an invention of the German graphic designer Anton Stankowski (1906–1998), who used it for the first time in 1934 on the cover of a Sulzer brochure for ventilation systems. However, it is based on a two-dimensional wordmark developed around 1933 with the Zurich native Hans Neuburg (1904–1983).

In 1932, Hans Neuburg received a commission to completely redesign the advertising materials for the products of the heating and ventilation department at Gebrüder Sulzer in Winterthur. Since this was his first advertising job for an industrial enterprise, for the graphics he hired the industry expert Anton Stankowski, whom he knew from Zurich’s Max Dalang advertising agency. Neuburg had worked there until 1929 as a copywriter, while Stankowski had worked until 1933 as a photographer and graphic artist. The two first subjected Sulzer’s printed materials and advertisements to a detailed analysis, and then updated them by introducing the unpretentious wordmark and the consistent application of the Akzidenz Grotesk typeface, one of the “cleanest” sans-serif fonts. This way, the company received an avowedly clear and “uniform look” with a “special character.” The cover Stankowski designed for a brochure on ventilation systems was a trailblazer in the further development of the wordmark: over a snow-white mountain landscape, a synonym for clean air, the perspectively modified Sulzer wordmark floats in the blue sky like a white cumulus cloud. After 1934, it was also applied to other advertising media, and later replaced the two-dimensional wordmark. It was applied variably, with or without a frame, in negative or positive. To what extent the Sulzer wordmark’s conception is attributable to Neuburg is unclear. What is certain is that the collaboration with Stankowski paved the way to his career as a designer. (Barbara Junod)

Reinzeichnung perspektivisches Logo, Sulzer, 1933
Gestaltung: Anton Stankowski mit Hans Neuburg
Auftrag: Gebrüder Sulzer AG, Winterthur, CH
Material/Technik: Halbkarton; Gouache mit weisser Deckfarbe für Korrekturen; Farbstift-Notiz
14.8 × 20.9 cm
Donation: Till Neuburg
Eigentum: Museum für Gestaltung Zürich / ZHdK
Literatureo

Jörg Stürzebecher, «Gelsenkirchen Zürich Stuttgart – Voraussetzungen und Stationen der Gebrauchsgrafik bis 1940», in: Ulrike Gauss (Hg.), Stankowski 06, Ostfildern-Ruit 2006, S. 54–64 (vgl. vor allem S. 61, 63, 65)

Carlo Pirovano (Hg.), Hans Neuburg – 50 anni di grafica costruttiva, Milano 1982, S. 55, 60–61.

Richard Paul Lohse/Josef Müller-Brockmann/Carlo Vivarelli (Hg.), «Hans Neuburg», Teufen 1964, S. 39, 52.

Hans Neuburg, «Zeichen und Marken», in: Moderne Werbe- und Gebrauchsgrafik, Ravensburg 1960, S. 76–81.

Hans Neuburg-Coray, «Werbung für eine Industriefirma» (Sulzer), in: TM – Typographische Monatsblätter, 1935, Heft 9, S. 281–285.

Image creditso

Reinzeichnung perspektivisches Logo, Sulzer, 1933, Gestaltung: Anton Stankowski mit Hans Neuburg, Donation: Till Neuburg
Abbildung: Museum für Gestaltung Zürich / ZHdK

Zeitungsinserat, Sulzer – Heizung Lüftung, 1933–1934, Gestaltung: Anton Stankowski mit Hans Neuburg
Abbildung: Museum für Gestaltung Zürich / ZHdK

Broschürenumschlag, Sulzer Lüftung, 1934, Gestaltung: Anton Stankowski
Abbildung: Stankowski-Stiftung

Werbeinserat, Sulzer Heizung – Lüftung, 1940, Gestaltung: Hans Neuburg, Donation: Till Neuburg
Abbildung: Museum für Gestaltung Zürich / ZHdK

Perspektivisches Logo, Sulzer, 1933, Gestaltung: Anton Stankowski mit Hans Neuburg, Donation: Till Neuburg
Abbildung: Museum für Gestaltung Zürich / ZHdK

Perspektivische Logoi, Sulzer, 1933, Gestaltung: Anton Stankowski mit Hans Neuburg, Donation: Till Neuburg
Abbildung: Museum für Gestaltung Zürich / ZHdK

Exhibition texto
Hans Neuburg – Logo and Brandmarks

The copywriter, graphic designer, and journalist Hans Neuburg (1904–1983) was a pioneer and advocate of constructive Swiss graphic design. Already in the 1930s, he promoted the notion of industrial advertising and began to design sober and informative “commercial faces” for companies such as Sulzer and von Roll in which both word- and brandmark play a central role. Neuburg successfully pursued this “nice but difficult” task, among many others, until the early 1970s.