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Collar, Kragen der Trauer, getragen auf blutrotem Kleid, 1989
Verena Sieber-Fuchs
Collar, Kragen der Trauer, getragen auf blutrotem Kleid,
Verena Sieber-Fuchs,

Collar, Kragen der Trauer, getragen auf blutrotem Kleid,
1989

Verena Sieber-Fuchs
*1074
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Museum für Gestaltung Zürich
Ausstellungsstrasse 60
8031 Zurich
Museum map
Museum für Gestaltung Zürich
Toni-Areal, Pfingstweidstrasse 94
8031 Zurich
  • Kragen der Trauer, getragen auf blutrotem Kleid Verena Sieber-Fuchs
  • Kragen der Trauer, getragen auf blutrotem Kleid Verena Sieber-Fuchs
  • Kragen der Trauer, getragen auf blutrotem Kleid Verena Sieber-Fuchs
  • Kragen der Trauer, getragen auf blutrotem Kleid Verena Sieber-Fuchs
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In experimental workpieces, Verena Sieber-Fuchs (b. 1943) composes what are typically small items deprived of their designated function into surprising new wholes imbued in equal measure with poetry, humor, and social criticism.

At the beginning of her career, Verena Sieber-Fuchs successfully produced tapestries and textile installations for public buildings. Turning her attention to jewelry, she then began to use unconventional materials, rousing them to new life in her own original way through astounding metamorphoses. Using crochet, for example, Sieber-Fuchs has created a large number of beautiful collars that delight the eye and recall the downy feathers of rare birds. But the lovely appearance of the adornment is then fractured, for example by the black edges of Kragen der Trauer – zu tragen zu einem blutroten Kleid (a mourning collar—designed to be worn with a blood-red gown) for which the artist used preprinted forms for Chinese funerals. The evocative mourning borders allude to the Tiananmen Square massacre in Beijing in 1989, which prompted the artist to produce this subversive commentary on contemporary events. Many of her other works betray a keen sense of humor, for example when, as a very petite woman, she dons the collar When I’m 52, which is made out of labels from large, size-52 clothing. Her jewelry crafted out of bottle caps from beverages that have long been taken off the market or redesigned attests to the far-sighted thinking that goes into her works. Sieber-Fuchs has long since earned a place for herself in the annals of textile art. Her works can be found today in prestigious museum collections worldwide. (Sabine Flaschberger)

Kragen der Trauer, getragen auf blutrotem Kleid, 1989
Entwurf/Ausführung: Verena Sieber-Fuchs
Material/Technik: Papier (Trauerformulare); Eisendraht
38 × 7 cm
Eigentum: Museum für Gestaltung Zürich / ZHdK
Image creditso

Kragen der Trauer, getragen auf blutrotem Kleid, 1989, Entwurf/Ausführung: Verena Sieber-Fuchs
Abbildung: Museum für Gestaltung Zürich / ZHdK

Kragen, Follow the line!, 1989, Entwurf/Ausführung: Verena Sieber-Fuchs
Abbildung: Museum für Gestaltung Zürich / ZHdK

Hut, Alles Konfetti, 2015, Entwurf/Ausführung: Verena Sieber-Fuchs
Abbildung: Museum für Gestaltung Zürich / ZHdK

Hut, Alles Konfetti, 2015, Entwurf/Ausführung: Verena Sieber-Fuchs
Abbildung: Museum für Gestaltung Zürich / ZHdK

Kragen, Kronkorken, 1985, Entwurf/Ausführung: Verena Sieber-Fuchs, Dauerleihgabe: Bundesamt für Kultur, Bern, CH
Abbildung: Museum für Gestaltung Zürich / ZHdK

Exhibition texto
Textiles: Collars and Trims

Collars can display a great variety of styles. With his collar and matching cuffs in brown with black trim, the Belgian artist and designer Henry van de Velde (1863–1957) focused on refining plain reform dresses. Two sets of collar and cuffs display Elsi Giauque’s (1900–1989) meticulous technique, while Anne-Martine Perriard (b. 1956) draws on a rich array of materials, converting coins into rosettes and combining them with human hair. Verena Sieber-Fuchs (b. 1943) made her mourning collar out of pre-printed forms for Chinese funerals as a lament against the Tiananmen Square massacre.