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Poster, Art = Ben – Art total, ca. 1963
Ben Vautier
Poster, Art = Ben – Art total,
Ben Vautier,

Poster, Art = Ben – Art total,
ca. 1963

Ben Vautier
*1101
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Museum für Gestaltung Zürich
Ausstellungsstrasse 60
8031 Zurich
Museum map
Museum für Gestaltung Zürich
Toni-Areal, Pfingstweidstrasse 94
8031 Zurich
  • Art = Ben – Art total Ben Vautier
  • Art = Ben – Art total Ben Vautier
  • Art = Ben – Art total Ben Vautier
  • Art = Ben – Art total Ben Vautier
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Artist Ben Vautier (b. 1935) still provokes today with his humorous small-format posters. As early as the 1960s, he was radically questioning the art establishment, and he integrated his own artistic ego into his total work of art.

With his formally concise text messages, reproduced in printed books, the Neo-Dadaist and Fluxus artist Ben Vautier sparked early debate about the structures and rules of the art world. The equation in this small-format poster is an ironic take on the belief in the aesthetic education of humans through art as well as the mandate of artists to offer enlightenment.
Ben engages with high culture in everyday life by way of playful actions. He has covered his house with his text images and small-format posters and they also adorn his record store in Nice, where the artist with Swiss roots now makes his home.
Ben continues to untiringly question the traditional understanding of art, even though he himself has long since been part of the art establishment; his interventions in public space likewise address controversial sociopolitical issues. The Swiss Pavilion at Expo ’92 in Seville was designed around Ben’s motto: “La Suisse n’existe pas.” (Bettina Richter)

Plakat, Art = Ben – Art total, um 1963
Erscheinungsland: Frankreich
Gestaltung: Ben Vautier
Auftrag: Ben Vautier
Material / Technik: Buchdruck
27.5 × 31.5 cm
Eigentum: Museum für Gestaltung Zürich / ZHdK
Literatureo

Museum für Gestaltung Zürich (Hg.), Hors-Sol – Poster Actions in Switzerland, Poster Collection 4, Zürich 2000, S. 14/15.

Image creditso

Plakat, Art = Ben – Art total, um 1963, Frankreich, Gestaltung: Ben Vautier
Abbildung: Museum für Gestaltung Zürich / ZHdK

Plakat, L’art est inutile, um 1963, Frankreich, Gestaltung: Ben Vautier
Abbildung: Museum für Gestaltung Zürich / ZHdK

Plakat, Absence d’art = art – Art total, um 1963, Frankreich, Gestaltung: Ben Vautier
Abbildung: Museum für Gestaltung Zürich / ZHdK

Plakat, L’art c’est fruité, um 1963, Frankreich, Gestaltung: Ben Vautier
Abbildung: Museum für Gestaltung Zürich / ZHdK

Haus von Ben Vautier in Nizza, Fotografie: unbekannt
Abbildung: http://la-lezardiere.eu/la-maison-de-ben/