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Fabric remnant, Bicchieri, 1958
Andrée Brossin de Méré
Fabric remnant, Bicchieri,
Andrée Brossin de Méré,

Fabric remnant, Bicchieri,
1958

Andrée Brossin de Méré
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Museum für Gestaltung Zürich
Ausstellungsstrasse 60
8031 Zurich
Museum map
Museum für Gestaltung Zürich
Toni-Areal, Pfingstweidstrasse 94
8031 Zurich
  • Bicchieri Andrée Brossin de Méré
  • Bicchieri Andrée Brossin de Méré
  • Bicchieri Andrée Brossin de Méré
  • Bicchieri Andrée Brossin de Méré
  • Bicchieri Andrée Brossin de Méré
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Listen to the text
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The inventive patterns introduced in the 1950s by the Swiss textile designer Andrée Brossin de Méré (1915–1987) at first put female customers’ taste to the test. The novel motifs, running the gamut from pea pods to dancing couples to towers of glasses, were so out of the ordinary that they took some getting used to.

Andrée Brossin de Méré’s creative energy was nurtured by a huge store of visual impressions, for she was an avid collector of every conceivable kind of art and craft as well as natural objects and also roved through major museums absorbing a wide variety of imagery. “Brossinette,” as she was affectionately known in Paris, demonstrated her passion for design in a multifaceted range of textiles. She found fitting subjects in black-and-white photographs, for example, cutting out the motifs and then combining them into groups. After tracing the motifs by hand using tracing paper, she tested various color schemes and had her employees convert her images into a repeating pattern, the indispensable starting point for every printed textile. In her fabric designs, Brossin de Méré created multiple variations on a single theme, as illustrated by her series showing historical drinking glasses. Brossin de Méré’s fabrics became known to the public through the creations of the great Parisian fashion houses. Her butterflies and begonias for Dior and animal prints and tulips for Givenchy caused a sensation. The unusual motifs at first went too far for the conservative French bourgeoisie. Undeterred, Brossin de Méré founded her own company in Paris in 1967 called Les tisseurs B de M, along with a large branch on Nüschelerstrasse 24 in Zurich under the name Tissus Brossin de Méré. In the early sixties, she also began to collaborate with the consortium of the five major textile makers in Como, as well as with the silk industry in Lyon. In 1969 Brossin de Méré came up with a new form of expression by assembling samples of her own prints to create patchwork pictures and fabrics—which were gladly taken up by Paco Rabanne, Yves Saint Laurent, and Nina Ricci. (Sabine Flaschberger)

Stoffcoupon, Bicchieri, 1958
Entwurf: Andrée Brossin de Méré
Herstellung: Filande e Tessitura Costa, Como, IT
Material/Technik: Seidensatin, Shantung-Effekt, bedruckt
90 × ca. 50 cm
Donation: Anne Marfurt Balduzzi und Familie Lienert
Eigentum: Museum für Gestaltung Zürich / ZHdK
Literatureo

Margherita Rosina/Francina Chiara, L’Età dell’Eleganza, Como 2010.

http://www.lesartsdecoratifs.fr

http://www.laprovinciadicomo.it

Image creditso

Stoffcoupon, Bicchieri, 1958, Entwurf: Andrée Brossin de Méré, Donation: Anne Marfurt Balduzzi und Familie Lienert
Abbildung: Museum für Gestaltung Zürich / ZHdK

Stoffcoupon, Bicchieri, 1958, Entwurf: Andrée Brossin de Méré, Donation: Anne Marfurt Balduzzi und Familie Lienert
Abbildung: Museum für Gestaltung Zürich / ZHdK

Stoffcoupon, Bicchieri, 1958, Entwurf: Andrée Brossin de Méré, Donation: Anne Marfurt Balduzzi und Familie Lienert
Abbildung: Museum für Gestaltung Zürich / ZHdK

Stoffcoupon, Bicchieri, 1958, Entwurf: Andrée Brossin de Méré, Donation: Anne Marfurt Balduzzi und Familie Lienert
Abbildung: Museum für Gestaltung Zürich / ZHdK

Stoffcoupon, Bicchieri, 1958, Entwurf: Andrée Brossin de Méré, Donation: Anne Marfurt Balduzzi und Familie Lienert
Abbildung: Museum für Gestaltung Zürich / ZHdK

Stoffcoupon, Les Coquillages, 1953, Entwurf: Andrée Brossin de Méré, Donation: Marguerite Binz
Abbildung: Museum für Gestaltung Zürich / ZHdK

Exhibition texto
Andrée Brossin de Méré – Haute Couture Fabrics

Andrée Brossin de Méré (1915–1987), who came to textile design by way of the theater, was commissioned in 1948 by a group of Swiss weaving mills to create fabrics for the Paris haute couture houses. The public was soon intrigued by her innovative designs for Christian Dior and Hubert de Givenchy. In 1967, the designer founded her own business in Paris called Les tisseurs B de M, with a branch in Zurich. Brossin de Méré’s fanciful and creative design approach can be seen in her richly varied collages of historical drinking glasses as repeating fabric patterns.