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Poster, Jürgen Uhde – Konzertante Klaviermusik, 1953
Otl Aicher
Poster, Jürgen Uhde – Konzertante Klaviermusik,
Otl Aicher,

Poster, Jürgen Uhde – Konzertante Klaviermusik,
1953

Otl Aicher
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Museum für Gestaltung Zürich
Ausstellungsstrasse 60
8031 Zurich
Museum map
Museum für Gestaltung Zürich
Toni-Areal, Pfingstweidstrasse 94
8031 Zurich
  • Jürgen Uhde – Konzertante Klaviermusik Otl Aicher Poster
  • Jürgen Uhde – Konzertante Klaviermusik Otl Aicher Poster
  • Jürgen Uhde – Konzertante Klaviermusik Otl Aicher Poster
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In Otl Aicher’s (1922–1991) series of small-format posters for events at the Ulmer Volkshochschule (Ulm adult education center), specific content was rendered visually abstract. The unusual square format allowed the posters to be grouped together harmoniously.

Comprehensive education in all areas of knowledge and culture was part of the program at the Ulmer Volkshochschule. Otl Aicher and his wife, Inge Aicher-Scholl (1917–1998), founded the school, which was a predecessor to the famous Ulmer Hochschule für Gestaltung (Ulm School of Design), immediately after World War II. They saw their work as a legacy, because Inge Aicher-Scholl was the sister of students Hans and Sophie Scholl, who were hanged in 1943 for their part in the White Rose resistance movement in Germany.
Aicher saw visual design as his personal sociopolitical mandate and as an ethical profession. In his posters, dynamic organic forms on a colored ground are juxtaposed with sober black-and-white designs arranged in geometric grids. But their ostensible austerity is misleading. For the announcement of Jürgen Uhde’s piano concert, Aicher used the order of the black piano keys to set the rhythm for a set of free-flowing lines. The intrusion of the word “Klaviermusik” also serves as a brief moment of disruption. (Bettina Richter)

Plakat, Jürgen Uhde – Konzertante Klaviermusik, 1953
Erscheinungsland: Deutschland
Gestaltung: Otl Aicher
Auftrag: Ulmer Volkshochschule, Ulm, DE
Material / Technik: Siebdruck
41.5 × 40 cm
Eigentum: Museum für Gestaltung Zürich / ZHdK
Donation: Ulmer Volkshochschule, Ulm, DE
Literatureo

Eva Moser, Otl Aicher, Gestalter, Ostfildern 2011.

Markus Rathgeb, Otl Aicher, London 2006.

Image creditso

Plakat, Jürgen Uhde – Konzertante Klaviermusik, 1953, Deutschland, Gestaltung: Otl Aicher, Donation: Ulmer Volkshochschule, Ulm, DE
Abbildung: Museum für Gestaltung Zürich / ZHdK

Plakat, Jürgen Uhde – Schuberts Klaviermusik, 1949, Deutschland, Gestaltung: Otl Aicher
Abbildung: Museum für Gestaltung Zürich / ZHdK

Plakat, Walter Jens – Ende und Anfang, 1951, Deutschland, Gestaltung: Otl Aicher
Abbildung: Museum für Gestaltung Zürich / ZHdK

Plakat, Deutsche Literatur seit 1914, um 1947, Deutschland, Gestaltung: Otl Aicher
Abbildung: Museum für Gestaltung Zürich / ZHdK

Exhibition texto
Otl Aicher

Otl Aicher (1922–1991) and Inge Scholl founded the Volkshochschule Ulm after the end of World War II. The lectures there addressed topics from various fields of knowledge, focusing mainly on civic education and environmental design. Aicher based his posters for the school on a system of so-called graphemes that are either round or square in shape. Their color scheme and formal concept are derived from the steles developed for the school: several posters together create an eye-catching color grid.