This is the eGuide number for the object. You can find it next to selected objects in the exhibition.
This is the location number for the object.
Click here to go to the main menu.
Click here to change languages.
Click here to change the font size and log in.
Click here to show the location of the object.
Zoom with two fingers and rotate images 360° with one finger. Swipe an object to the side to see the next one.
Click here for background information, biographies, legends, etc.
Click here to listen to spoken texts or audio files.
Share an object.
Download as PDF.
Add to saved objects.
 
Poster, Laforet / Happy Anniversary, 2005
Poster, Laforet / Happy Anniversary,
*4062

Poster, Laforet / Happy Anniversary,
2005

*4062
g
[{"lat":47.3831548522839,"lng":8.536068911708824},{"floor":"floorplan-2"}]
BF
GF
1
2
2
Museum für Gestaltung Zürich
Ausstellungsstrasse 60
8031 Zurich
Museum map
Museum für Gestaltung Zürich
Toni-Areal, Pfingstweidstrasse 94
8031 Zurich
Pavillon Le Corbusier
Höschgasse 8
8008 Zürich
Museum map
  • Laforet / Happy Anniversary Poster
g
6
7
ENG-2022_12.mp3
Video, Laforet Spring, 2004, Japan, Gestaltung: Nagi Noda Quelle: youtube

Artist Nagi Noda (1973–2008), who died young, was considered the enfant terrible of Japanese graphic design. In her works, she broke with conventions to create her own distinctive universe with an individual visual language—and nonetheless reached a large audience.

Nagi Noda designed stuffed animals and bags, made music clips and advertising videos, and created fascinating hair sculptures. Time and again, she struck a balance between mainstream aesthetics and visual disorientation shot through with ambiguity and irony. One example is her poster for the trendy Japanese department store Laforet, in which a powerful fantasy animal holds a petite young woman in its arms—a scene that brings to mind both the French fairy tale classic Beauty and the Beast and the Hollywood movie King Kong. The eyeless beast appears harmless due to its plumpness and its fur of flowers, yet its sharp teeth and claws convey a contrasting air of danger: blood-red petals drip from its maw and the woman’s mouth, spreading over a white dress that signals innocence. However, the mighty beast also has a “bleeding” wound. Noda’s colorful, initially cheerful-looking poster thus provokes a surprisingly equivocal and enigmatic cluster of interpretations. (Bettina Richter)

Plakat, Laforet – Happy Anniversary, 2005
Erscheinungsland: Japan
Gestaltung: Nagi Noda
Auftrag: Laforet Harajuku, Tokio, JP
Material / Technik: Offset
103 × 73 cm
Donation: Takayuki Soeda
Eigentum: Museum für Gestaltung Zürich / ZHdK
Literature

Museum für Gestaltung Zürich (Hg.), Japan – Nippon, Poster Collection 26, Zürich 2014.

Florian Hufnagl, Japanische Plakate – heute. Eine Ausstellung in Kooperation mit DNP Dai Nippon Printing Co. Tokyo / Japanese Posters Today: From the DNP Archive of Graphic Design, München 2006.

Image credits

Plakat, Laforet – Happy Anniversary, 2005, Japan, Gestaltung: Nagi Noda
Abbildung: Museum für Gestaltung Zürich / ZHdK

Plakat, Vivre, 2004, Japan, Gestaltung: Nagi Noda, Donation: Takayuki Soeda
Abbildung: Museum für Gestaltung Zürich / ZHdK