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Poster, Laissez-moi encore dix ans je reprendrai vos augmentations!, 1968
Atelier Populaire
Poster, Laissez-moi encore dix ans je reprendrai vos augmentations!
Atelier Populaire,

Poster, Laissez-moi encore dix ans je reprendrai vos augmentations!,
1968

Atelier Populaire
*1015
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Museum für Gestaltung Zürich
Ausstellungsstrasse 60
8031 Zurich
Museum map
Museum für Gestaltung Zürich
Toni-Areal, Pfingstweidstrasse 94
8031 Zurich
  • Laissez-moi encore dix ans je reprendrai vos augmentations! Atelier Populaire Poster
  • Laissez-moi encore dix ans je reprendrai vos augmentations! Atelier Populaire Poster
  • Laissez-moi encore dix ans je reprendrai vos augmentations! Atelier Populaire Poster
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Listen to the text
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In sweltering May 1968, the façades of Paris were transformed into walls of resistance. Posters with an immediacy and emotional charge, the result of a deliberately limited color range and an amateurish character, appeared everywhere and then changed again overnight. Over and over again they displayed the unmistakable features of Charles de Gaulle (1890–1970).

In 1968, students at the École des Beaux Arts in Paris set out to use the poster as a medium of resistance while at the same time reconceiving its formal properties. Charles de Gaulle was the main character featured, embodying as president of the Republic the rigid, conservative French society. He represented the authoritarian claim to power and hegemony of the state. Often reduced to a mere outline, his prominent nose and ears as well as his beloved general’s uniform with cap were enough to signify his presence. The line drawing of the frontal, caricature-like portrait is joined here to a black block that represents his upper body. De Gaulle’s face stands out all the more strikingly as a result. The text is clearly legible against the black ground. An ironic phrase is put in De Gaulle’s mouth, alluding to his ten-year term in office and his highly controversial wage cuts. Along with political issues, the precarious social situation of many workers was one of the reasons for the strikes and riots of 1968. This resulted, particularly in Paris, in a rare combination of student revolt and worker protests. The official image of the president has been subverted here in a variety of ways. On the posters, De Gaulle is at once a power-hungry dictator and a puppet controlled by foreign interests. (Bettina Richter)

Plakat, Laissez-moi encore dix ans je reprendrai vos augmentations !, 1968
Erscheinungsland: Frankreich
Gestaltung: Atelier Populaire, Paris, FR
Porträtierte Person: Charles André de Gaulle
Auftrag: Atelier Populaire, Paris, FR
Material/Technik: Siebdruck
58.5 x 45 cm
Eigentum: Museum für Gestaltung Zürich / ZHdK
Literatureo

Museum für Gestaltung Zürich, Bettina Richter (Hg.), Kopf an Kopf, Poster Collection 19, Zürich 2008.

Image creditso

Plakat, Laissez-moi encore dix ans je reprendrai vos augmentations !, 1968, Frankreich, Gestaltung: Atelier Populaire, Paris, FR
Abbildung: Museum für Gestaltung Zürich / ZHdK

Plakat, En Médicine comme partout, plus de grand patron, 1968, Frankreich, Gestaltung: Atelier Populaire, Paris, FR
Abbildung: Museum für Gestaltung Zürich / ZHdK

Plakat, (ohne Text), 1968, Frankreich, Gestaltung: Atelier Populaire, Paris, FR
Abbildung: Museum für Gestaltung Zürich / ZHdK

Plakat, L‘état c’est moi, 1968, Frankreich, Gestaltung: Atelier Populaire, Paris, FR
Abbildung: Museum für Gestaltung Zürich / ZHdK

Exhibition texto
May 1968

In May 1968, young art students discovered the poster as a medium for resistance. Plastered overnight on surfaces all over the city, these posters rely for their impact on symbolic reduction and the combination of familiar signs with new and inventive imagery. The exuberant pictorial and verbal wit is at the same time a plea for a previously unknown zest for turning things political. Charles de Gaulle is the main character in the posters: the president of the French Republic exemplified at the time the state’s authoritarian claim to power.