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Poster, Luis Buñuel – Filmpodium Zürich, 1980
Paul Brühwiler
Poster, Luis Buñuel – Filmpodium Zürich
Paul Brühwiler,

Poster, Luis Buñuel – Filmpodium Zürich,
1980

Paul Brühwiler
*1046
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Museum für Gestaltung Zürich
Ausstellungsstrasse 60
8031 Zurich
Museum map
Museum für Gestaltung Zürich
Toni-Areal, Pfingstweidstrasse 94
8031 Zurich
  • Luis Buñuel – Filmpodium Zürich Paul Brühwiler Poster
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Paul Brühwiler (b. 1939) has devoted his career to the cultural poster and for many years designed film posters. For a 1980 retrospective on Luis Buñuel (1900–1983) at the Filmpodium Zürich, he designed a poster that impressively captures the distinctive features of the Spanish-Mexican film director.

From up close Paul Brühwiler’s Buñuel portrait looks almost like an abstract painting. From a distance, however, the expressive countenance, captured with intense choppy brushstrokes, seems very much alive. Despite his prolific poster output, Brühwiler has never become mired in routine. He combines photographic, graphical/painterly, and typographic approaches to convey an immediate personal message. Buñuel, whose Surrealist films brought bewildering imagery that oscillated between dream and nightmare to the big screen, frequently inveighed against what he saw as a moribund bourgeoisie. Brühwiler’s poster shows the director not frontally but in a three-quarter view. Rather than returning the viewer’s gaze, the subject looks inward, absorbed in thought, and thus aptly reflects Buñuel’s film doctrine: he did not set out to rationally explain the world with his films but instead tried to produce images that would develop a life of their own in the audience’s subconscious. The lofty white brown melds into the white of the background, leaving space for the handwritten inscription. Despite the outward impression of repose conveyed by the downward gaze, Buñuel’s inner agitation is made palpable through color: the blood-red marks on the left side of his face that look to have been left by blows compellingly evoke his vulnerability. Buñuel’s expressive face also dominates the poster by the Turkish graphic designer Yurdaer Altıntaș (b. 1935) for the 16th International Istanbul Film Festival. (Bettina Richter)

Plakat, Luis Buñuel – Filmpodium Zürich, 1980
Erscheinungsland: Schweiz
Gestaltung: Paul Brühwiler
Porträtierte Person: Luis Buñuel
Auftrag: Filmpodium Zürich, CH
Material/Technik: Offsetdruck
127 x 90 cm
Donation: Paul Brühwiler
Eigentum: Museum für Gestaltung Zürich / ZHdK
Literatureo

Paul Brühwiler (Hg.), Pabrü. Plakate. Bilder. Zeichnungen, Bern 1999

Image creditso

Plakat, Luis Buñuel – Filmpodium Zürich, 1980, Schweiz, Gestaltung: Paul Brühwiler, Donation: Paul Brühwiler
Abbildung: Museum für Gestaltung Zürich / ZHdK

Plakat, In Memoriam – Luis Buñuel, 1997, Türkei, Gestaltung: Yurdaer Altıntaș
Abbildung: Museum für Gestaltung Zürich / ZHdK

Exhibition texto
Paul Brühwiler - Filmpodium Zürich

From up close, Paul Brühwiler’s (b. 1939) portrait of Luis Buñuel looks almost like an abstract painting. From a distance, however, the expressive countenance, captured with choppy brushstrokes, seems very much alive. Buñuel’s Surrealist films brought bewildering imagery that oscillates between dream and nightmare to the big screen. In his poster, Brühwiler shows the director in a three-quarter view with an inward-directed gaze. Despite the impression of repose, Buñuel’s inner agitation and creative restlessness are immediately palpable.