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Sugar bowl, (untitled), ca. 1820
Johannes Herrmann
Sugar bowl, (untitled),
Johannes Herrmann,

Sugar bowl, (untitled),
ca. 1820

Johannes Herrmann
*1541
g1R0
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GF
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Museum für Gestaltung Zürich
Ausstellungsstrasse 60
8031 Zurich
Museum map
Museum für Gestaltung Zürich
Toni-Areal, Pfingstweidstrasse 94
8031 Zurich
  • (untitled) Johannes Herrmann
  • (untitled) Johannes Herrmann
  • (untitled) Johannes Herrmann
  • (untitled) Johannes Herrmann
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Listen to the text
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Langnau in the Emmental region developed into an important center for ceramic production in the seventeenth century, influenced especially by several generations of the Hermann family of potters. This sugar bowl from the workshop of Johannes Herrmann (1754–1820) takes its place within a whole series of sugar bowls in diverse shapes. Joined by plates and other tableware, the bowls adorned the rooms and dinner tables of the well-heeled, rural upper and middle class in the Emmental region.

Over one hundred of these three-legged sugar bowls from Langnau still survive today. The bowls from the workshop of Johannes Hermann stand out from those produced by other workshops through their characteristic little feet, grooved ring grips, and twisted vertical handles with leaves at the side. The lid handles take the form of ribbon-shaped volutes accompanied by various birds, which either sit on a pointed knob or in a nest made up of four thick, notched leaves, as in the present case. White dots applied across broad surfaces with the slip trailer are typical. They may be combined with further patterns such as dotted rosettes or even one- or two-tone circles. The small sugar bowl thus bears witness to the economic upturn of this rural region in the Canton of Bern, which around 1800 could already boast a proud, confident, and educated middle and upper class who took for granted partaking daily in coffee with cream and sugar. (Andreas Heege und Franziska Müller-Reissmann)

Zuckerdose, um 1820
Entwurf/Ausführung: Johannes Herrmann
Material/Technik: Irdenware, gedreht, frei aufgebaut, engobiert, Schlickermalerei
19.9 x 13.5 cm
Eigentum: Museum für Gestaltung Zürich / ZHdK
Literatureo

Andreas Heege/Andreas Kistler, Keramik aus Langnau. Zur Geschichte der bedeutendsten Landhafnerei im Kanton Bern (Schriften des Bernischen Historischen Museums 13), Bern 2017.

Image creditso

Zuckerdose, um 1820, Entwurf/Ausführung: Johannes Herrmann
Abbildung: Museum für Gestaltung Zürich / ZHdK

Zuckerdose, um 1870, Entwurf/Ausführung: unbekannt
Abbildung: Museum für Gestaltung Zürich / ZHdK

Zuckerbowl, um 1840, Entwurf/Ausführung: unbekannt
Abbildung: Museum für Gestaltung Zürich / ZHdK

Zuckerdose, 1830, Entwurf/Ausführung: unbekannt
Abbildung: Museum für Gestaltung Zürich / ZHdK

Zuckerdose, um 1810, Entwurf/Ausführung: unbekannt
Abbildung: Museum für Gestaltung Zürich / ZHdK