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Poster, Horalka (La ciociara), 1962
Jaroslav Fišer
Poster, Horalka (La ciociara),
Jaroslav Fišer,

Poster, Horalka (La ciociara),
1962

Jaroslav Fišer
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Museum für Gestaltung Zürich
Ausstellungsstrasse 60
8031 Zurich
Museum map
Museum für Gestaltung Zürich
Toni-Areal, Pfingstweidstrasse 94
8031 Zurich
  • Horalka (La ciociara) Jaroslav Fišer Poster
  • Horalka (La ciociara) Jaroslav Fišer Poster
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In the Czechoslovakia of the early 1960s, one of the ways the social and cultural spirit of renewal expressed itself was in a new aesthetic. While Socialist Realism continued to dominate officially promoted art, movie posters became a creative playground.

The Constructivism and Surrealism of the prewar period, as well as contemporary international trends, had no place in the state art industry of the ČSSR. In applied art on the other hand, painters discovered space for artistic creativity where they could experiment with stylistic models. At the same time, foreign movies were conquering the theaters.
Vittorio De Sica’s film La ciociara (Two Women) is based on a novel by Alberto Moravia. It tells of the fight for survival in fascist Italy of the beautiful Cesira, played by Sophia Loren, and her daughter Rosetta. Jaroslav Fišer (1919–2003) compresses the melodrama into an expressive image. In the background, the figure of Rosetta can be seen as a vertical extension of the column of text. The gaze, however, is drawn to the pained figure of Cesira in the foreground. The motif flung into the upper half of the poster in the fervent style of Tachisme reflects her emotions and can also be read as a darkened sun.

Plakat, Horalka (Originalfilmtitel: La ciociara), 1962
Erscheinungsland: Tschechoslowakische Republik
Gestaltung: Jaroslav Fišer
Auftrag: Ústřední půjčovna filmů, Prag, CS
Material / Technik: Offset
41 × 29 cm
Eigentum: Museum für Gestaltung Zürich / ZHdK
Donation: Peter Leuenberger
Literatureo

Dušan Brozman, «Eine bildnerische Angelegenheit. Das tschechische Filmplakat seit den sechziger Jahren», in: Wolfgang Beilenhoff, Martin Heller (Hg.), Das Filmplakat, Zürich 1995, S. 194–222.

Image creditso

Plakat, Horalka (Originalfilmtitel: La ciociara), 1962, Tschechoslowakische Republik, Gestaltung: Jaroslav Fišer, Donation: Peter Leuenberger
Abbildung: Museum für Gestaltung Zürich / ZHdK

Plakat, Zlaté kapradí, 1963, Tschechoslowakische Republik, Gestaltung: Jaroslav Fišer, Donation: Peter Leuenberger
Abbildung: Museum für Gestaltung Zürich / ZHdK

Plakat, Jarní povětří, 1960, Tschechoslowakische Republik, Gestaltung: Jaroslav Fišer, Donation: Peter Leuenberger
Abbildung: Museum für Gestaltung Zürich / ZHdK

Exhibition texto
Czechoslovakian Film

Czechoslovakian film posters are never only about illustrating the subject of the film or promoting its stars. Stills and movie-star portraits serve merely as image material to be irreverently subverted, creatively modified, and reassembled using the collage technique. Vittorio De Sica’s classic Two Women (La ciociara), starring Sophia Loren and set in the Mussolini era, is promoted in a poster that is both poetic and emotionally stirring.