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Cup, (untitled), ca. 1745
Königlich-Polnische und Kurfürstlich-Sächsische Porzellan-Manufaktur Meissen
Cup, (untitled),
Königlich-Polnische und Kurfürstlich-Sächsische Porzellan-Manufaktur Meissen,

Cup, (untitled),
ca. 1745

Königlich-Polnische und Kurfürstlich-Sächsische Porzellan-Manufaktur Meissen
*1054
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Museum für Gestaltung Zürich
Ausstellungsstrasse 60
8031 Zurich
Museum map
Museum für Gestaltung Zürich
Toni-Areal, Pfingstweidstrasse 94
8031 Zurich
  • (untitled) Königlich-Polnische und Kurfürstlich-Sächsische Porzellan-Manufaktur Meissen
  • (untitled) Königlich-Polnische und Kurfürstlich-Sächsische Porzellan-Manufaktur Meissen
  • (untitled) Königlich-Polnische und Kurfürstlich-Sächsische Porzellan-Manufaktur Meissen
  • (untitled) Königlich-Polnische und Kurfürstlich-Sächsische Porzellan-Manufaktur Meissen
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Listen to the text
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The festively decked-out bourgeois table has notoriously provided a playground for myriad floral motifs. The trembleuse, or tremble cup, however, was specifically designed instead for serving hot drinks in bed.

While the cup known as a trembleuse would today appear ideal for a latte macchiato, in the eighteenth century it was used for drinking costly cocoa, which was heavily sweetened and served boiled in water. In patrician European circles, the colonial product was considered particularly salubrious and was also valued for its aphrodisiac properties. The wreath around the saucer with its filigree openwork provided a better grip on the cup, especially important when drinking hot beverages in bed. The trembleuse was thus by no means created only for jittery or clumsy hands. Scattered carnation, rose, and pansy blooms depicted in their natural colors adorn both the handleless cup and the saucer. Insects were made an integral part of the ornament, ranging from ladybugs and butterflies all the way down to humble moths and even mosquitoes. Depicted with shadows, they have a highly graphic appearance, imitating reality in an almost frightening way. The hallmark of the Meissen porcelain manufactory is crossed swords, derived from the coat of arms of the margraves of Meissen. (Sabine Flaschberger)

Tasse mit Trembleuse, um 1745
Herstellung: Königlich-Polnische und Kurfürstlich-Sächsische Porzellan-Manufaktur Meissen, DE
Material/Technik: Porzellan, Aufglasurmalerei, teilweise vergoldet
9.5 x 8.5 cm (Tasse), 5.5 x 16.5 cm (Untertasse)
Donation: Jürg Conzett
Eigentum: Museum für Gestaltung Zürich / ZHdK
Literatureo

www.porzellan-stiftung.de

Image creditso

Tasse mit Trembleuse, um 1745, Herstellung: Königlich-Polnische und Kurfürstlich-Sächsische Porzellan-Manufaktur Meissen, DE, Donation: Jürg Conzett
Abbildung: Museum für Gestaltung Zürich / ZHdK

Tasse mit Trembleuse, um 1745, Herstellung: Königlich-Polnische und Kurfürstlich-Sächsische Porzellan-Manufaktur Meissen, DE, Donation: Jürg Conzett
Abbildung: Museum für Gestaltung Zürich / ZHdK

Zuckerdose, um 1750, Herstellung: Königlich-Polnische und Kurfürstlich-Sächsische Porzellan-Manufaktur Meissen, DE, Donation: Louise Muth
Abbildung: Museum für Gestaltung Zürich / ZHdK

Zuckerdose mit Schneckendeckel, um 1745, Herstellung: Königlich-Polnische und Kurfürstlich-Sächsische Porzellan-Manufaktur Meissen, DE, Donation: Jürg Conzett
Abbildung: Museum für Gestaltung Zürich / ZHdK

Kaffeeservice, um 1878, Herstellung: Königlich-Sächsische Porzellan-Manufaktur Meissen, DE
Abbildung: Museum für Gestaltung Zürich / ZHdK

Exhibition texto
Tea Culture

The culture of fine dining in Switzerland is closely tied to the invention of European porcelain in the early eighteenth century. This technical achievement culminated in the establishment of the leading European porcelain manufactory, Meissen, in 1710. Kilchberg-Schooren (1763–1906) in Zurich produced equally elaborate designs and was a key supplier of high-quality tableware in soft-paste and hard-paste porcelain in the brief but brilliant porcelain heyday of the eighteenth century. “Schooren” pieces are particularly prized for their fine painted ornament.