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Poster, Que fais-tu pour empêcher cela? Madrid, 1937
Josep Renau
Poster, Que fais-tu pour empêcher cela? Madrid,
Josep Renau,

Poster, Que fais-tu pour empêcher cela? Madrid,
1937

Josep Renau
*1094
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Museum für Gestaltung Zürich
Ausstellungsstrasse 60
8031 Zurich
Museum map
Museum für Gestaltung Zürich
Toni-Areal, Pfingstweidstrasse 94
8031 Zurich
  • Que fais-tu pour empêcher cela?  Madrid Josep Renau Poster
  • Que fais-tu pour empêcher cela?  Madrid Josep Renau Poster
  • Que fais-tu pour empêcher cela?  Madrid Josep Renau Poster
  • Que fais-tu pour empêcher cela?  Madrid Josep Renau Poster
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Using a photograph probably taken by famous war reporter Robert Capa (1913–1954), this poster calls upon the international opponents of Franco’s fascism to support the Spanish Republic. Realistic and emotionalizing pictorial formulas were masterfully unified to this end.

During the Spanish Civil War, Josep Renau (1907–1982) was commissioned by the Spanish Republic to create a number of posters, and this one is attributed to him. In the hands of the Republicans at the time, Madrid was bombarded by Franco’s troops in 1936 with the aid of the German Condor Legion. The photomontage brings together the burning ruins of a house, an airplane squadron, and a photograph of a mother and her small child. The composition, which draws upon Constructivism, enhances the drama by forcing the two faces into a black wedge. Desperation and distress become instantly apparent.
Photos of suffering or murdered children were used as propaganda for the first time in the Spanish Civil War. The motif of mother and child, by contrast, has been common in antiwar posters since the end of World War I. Here, there is an effort to engage Christian iconography, while women and children also represent the innocent civilian victims of modern warfare. (Bettina Richter)

Plakat, Que fais-tu pour empêcher cela? Madrid, 1937
Erscheinungsland: Frankreich
Gestaltung: Josep Renau (zugeschrieben), Fotografie: Robert Capa (zugeschrieben)
Auftrag: Ministerio de Propaganda, Junta delegada de Defensa de Madrid, ES
Material / Technik: Lithografie, Tiefdruck
39.5 × 27.5 cm
Eigentum: Museum für Gestaltung Zürich / ZHdK
Literatureo

www.dhm.de/archiv/magazine/spanien/Politik%20und%20Werbung%20im%20Plakat.htm

Image creditso

Plakat, Que fais-tu pour empêcher cela? Madrid, 1937, Frankreich, Gestaltung: Josep Renau (zugeschrieben), Fotografie: Robert Capa (zugeschrieben)
Abbildung: Museum für Gestaltung Zürich / ZHdK

Plakat, Que haces tu para evitar esto? Ayuda a Madrid, 1937, Spanien, Gestaltung: Augusto (zugeschrieben), Fotografie: Robert Capa
Abbildung: Museum für Gestaltung Zürich / ZHdK

Plakat, Pour le désarmement des nations, 1932, Frankreich, Gestaltung: Jean Carlu, Fotografie: André Vigneau
Abbildung: Museum für Gestaltung Zürich / ZHdK

Plakat, Wenn wir es nicht wollen, wird es nie sein!, 1957, Deutsche Demokratische Republik, Gestaltung: John Heartfield
Abbildung: Museum für Gestaltung Zürich / ZHdK

Plakat, Lūk, tava seja, Amerika!, 1972, Sowjetunion, Gestaltung: Jān Reinbergs
Abbildung: Museum für Gestaltung Zürich / ZHdK

Exhibition texto
Spanish Civil War

In 1937, in the middle of the Spanish Civil War, a poster pleaded for relief for a beleaguered Madrid. A photograph by Robert Capa (1913–1954) is an emotional appeal to everyone to put a stop to all war. Other posters tried to keep up the morale of the Popular Front against the Fascist forces by showing heroic images of farmers and workers. Meanwhile, didactic newspapers posted on the wall provided the international war volunteers with detailed instruction in combat techniques.