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Poster, Vautier César, 1937
Adolphe Mouron Cassandre
Poster, Vautier César,
Adolphe Mouron Cassandre,

Poster, Vautier César,
1937

Adolphe Mouron Cassandre
*1095
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Museum für Gestaltung Zürich
Ausstellungsstrasse 60
8031 Zurich
Museum map
Museum für Gestaltung Zürich
Toni-Areal, Pfingstweidstrasse 94
8031 Zurich
  • Vautier César Adolphe Mouron Cassandre
  • Vautier César Adolphe Mouron Cassandre
  • Vautier César Adolphe Mouron Cassandre
  • Vautier César Adolphe Mouron Cassandre
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It is rare for a poster designer to lend their name to an epoch. The years between 1925 and 1935, when Adolphe Mouron Cassandre (Adolphe Jean Marie Mouron, 1901–1968) produced approximately one hundred posters, are an exception. They went down in history as the “Époque Cassandre.”

Adolphe Mouron Cassandre realized that an essential law of the poster medium is the need to catch the viewer’s eye from a distance. He broke with the enthusiasm for narrative of his predecessors and focused on a single main motif. But monumentality not only dominates his famous posters of ships’ bows and railways, which pay homage to the contemporary faith in technology. In this small-format poster from 1937, a hand is blown up in size. It is not the pleasurable aspect of smoking that is presented but rather the advertised product itself. The monumental effect is enhanced even further by making the hand appear as if cut from stone and placed on a pedestal. Its sculptural solidity stands out from the gentle color gradient in the background. Cassandre repeated this motif in other posters for the tobacco industry, with variations in the hand’s posture. The integration of the lettering into the composition, which is typical for Cassandre, can also be found in another hand poster from 1931. (Bettina Richter)

Plakat, Vautier César, 1937
Erscheinungsland : Frankreich
Gestaltung: Adolphe Mouron Cassandre (Adolphe Jean Marie Mouron)
Auftrag: Henri Vautier Frères et Cie., Grandson, CH
Material / Technik: Lithografie
35 × 25 cm
Eigentum: Museum für Gestaltung Zürich / ZHdK
Literatureo

Museum für Kunst und Gewerbe (Hg.), Plakatkunst von Toulouse-Lautrec bis Benetton, Köln 1995, S. 104/105.

Image creditso

Plakat, Vautier César, 1937, Frankreich, Gestaltung: Adolphe Mouron Cassandre (Adolphe Jean Marie Mouron)
Abbildung: Museum für Gestaltung Zürich / ZHdK

Plakat, Vautier Marocaine, 1935, Frankreich, Gestaltung: Adolphe Mouron Cassandre (Adolphe Jean Marie Mouron)
Abbildung: Museum für Gestaltung Zürich / ZHdK

Plakat, Tabac Kisroul, 1935, Frankreich, Gestaltung: Adolphe Mouron Cassandre (Adolphe Jean Marie Mouron)
Abbildung: Museum für Gestaltung Zürich / ZHdK

Plakat, Pacific, 1935, Frankreich, Gestaltung: Adolphe Mouron Cassandre (Adolphe Jean Marie Mouron)
Abbildung: Museum für Gestaltung Zürich / ZHdK

Plakat, Thomson – La main-d’oeuvre électro-domestique, 1931, Frankreich, Gestaltung: Adolphe Mouron Cassandre (Adolphe Jean Marie Mouron)
Abbildung: Museum für Gestaltung Zürich / ZHdK

Exhibition texto
Consumer Posters - classics

While product marketing is today firmly in the hands of advertising agencies, at the beginning of the twentieth century many outstanding poster designers promoted consumer goods with their art. Their creative freedom knew no bounds. Original imagery caught the eye with clever wit and poetry and aroused the urge to buy. Another aspect that raises these small posters to iconic status is their carefully chosen color palette. Printed as lithographs, they still exude an irresistible appeal today.