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Poster, Wohnungsreinigung mit Saugluft, ca. 1910
Lucian Bernhard
Poster, Wohnungsreinigung mit Saugluft,
Lucian Bernhard,

Poster, Wohnungsreinigung mit Saugluft,
ca. 1910

Lucian Bernhard
*1106
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Museum für Gestaltung Zürich
Ausstellungsstrasse 60
8031 Zurich
Museum map
Museum für Gestaltung Zürich
Toni-Areal, Pfingstweidstrasse 94
8031 Zurich
  • Wohnungsreinigung mit Saugluft Lucian Bernhard Poster
  • Wohnungsreinigung mit Saugluft Lucian Bernhard Poster
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Lucian Bernhard (Emil Kahn, 1883–1972) is known as the pioneer of the Sachplakat (object poster) style, which moved oversized images of the branded products of the nascent consumer society to center stage. In this case, however, he chose to use humor to advertise a vacuum cleaner.

The vacuum cleaner was invented in the 1860s in the United States but did not appear on the German market until the turn of the twentieth century. It would remain a luxury item there until World War II. Bernhard’s charming poster with its luminous contrasting complementary colors makes it directly obvious how this cleaning appliance works: a strange-looking red imaginary animal with a long, funnel-like trunk sits on a green carpet and vacuums.
Bernhard, who invented the Sachplakat style when he designed a famous poster for Priester-Zündhölzer (matches) in 1903, was perhaps a little overwhelmed in this case by the challenge of providing a simplified portrayal of the technical complexity of early vacuum cleaners. A poster by Hans Neumann from around the same period offers a detailed image of the state-of-the-art household appliance, but here too there is a look of astonishment on the user’s face. (Bettina Richter)

Plakat, Wohnungsreinigung mit Saugluft, um 1910
Erscheinungsland: Deutschland
Gestaltung: Lucian Bernhard (Emil Kahn)
Auftrag: Staubsauge-Gesellschaft m.b.H., Berlin, DE
Material / Technik: Lithografie
48 × 35 cm
Eigentum: Museum für Gestaltung Zürich / ZHdK
Literatureo

Institut für Auslandsbeziehungen e.V., Stuttgart (Hg.), Lucian Bernhard, Stuttgart 1999.

Image creditso

Plakat, Wohnungsreinigung mit Saugluft, um 1910, Deutschland, Gestaltung: Lucian Bernhard (Emil Kahn)
Abbildung: Museum für Gestaltung Zürich / ZHdK

Plakat, Elektor, um 1914, Schweiz, Gestaltung: Hans Neumann
Abbildung: Museum für Gestaltung Zürich / ZHdK

Plakat, Vertex, 1905, Deutschland, Gestaltung: Lucian Bernhard (Emil Kahn)
Abbildung: Museum für Gestaltung Zürich / ZHdK

Exhibition texto
Consumer Posters - classics

While product marketing is today firmly in the hands of advertising agencies, at the beginning of the twentieth century many outstanding poster designers promoted consumer goods with their art. Their creative freedom knew no bounds. Original imagery caught the eye with clever wit and poetry and aroused the urge to buy. Another aspect that raises these small posters to iconic status is their carefully chosen color palette. Printed as lithographs, they still exude an irresistible appeal today.