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Poster, Zakon i Dolg – Amok (Amoki), 1927
Grigorij Il’ič BorisovNikolaj Petrovič Prusakov
Poster, Zakon i Dolg – Amok (Amoki),
Grigorij Il’ič Borisov, Nikolaj Petrovič Prusakov,

Poster, Zakon i Dolg – Amok (Amoki),
1927

Grigorij Il’ič BorisovNikolaj Petrovič Prusakov
*1109
gD7
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Museum für Gestaltung Zürich
Ausstellungsstrasse 60
8031 Zurich
Museum map
Museum für Gestaltung Zürich
Toni-Areal, Pfingstweidstrasse 94
8031 Zurich
  • Zakon i Dolg – Amok (Amoki) Grigorij Il’ič Borisov Nikolaj Petrovič Prusakov
  • Zakon i Dolg – Amok (Amoki) Grigorij Il’ič Borisov Nikolaj Petrovič Prusakov
  • Zakon i Dolg – Amok (Amoki) Grigorij Il’ič Borisov Nikolaj Petrovič Prusakov
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With his bold graphic works, Nikolai Petrovich Prusakov (1900–1952) revolutionized poster art. Often working in collaboration with Grigori Ilyich Borisov (1899–1942), he designed movie posters that translated the new visual experience of moving cinema images onto static surfaces.

In the 1920s, the advent of cinematic art in the young Soviet Union led to a radical break with traditional forms of perceptual experience and design. The innovative technique expressed in exemplary form in the montage films by Sergei Mikhailovich Eisenstein (1898–1948) was applied to poster art by young Constructivists in the orbit of the brothers Georgii Augustovich Stenberg (1900–1933) and Vladimir Augustovich Stenberg (1899–1982). The Stenberg brothers themselves designed some 300 movie posters that use experimental means to suggest rhythm and dynamism.
More radical still are the posters designed by Nikolai Petrovich Prusakov. With their grids, motion diagrams, and the alternation between faces painted in a photo- illusionistic style and very detailed still photographs, they broke with conventional imagery. His poster for the movie Amok is a good example. Here, the rotating color and black-and-white film strips are divided into individual segments to become one single oscillating surface. (Bettina Richter)

Plakat, Zakon i Dolg – Amok (Originalfilmtitel: Amoki), 1927
Erscheinungsland: Sowjetunion
Gestaltung: Nikolaj Petrovič Prusakov, Grigorij Il’ič Borisov
Auftrag: Sovkino, Moskau, SU
Material / Technik: Lithografie
104 × 69 cm
Eigentum: Museum für Gestaltung Zürich / ZHdK
Literatureo

Anna Kanaï, «Der gedruckte Film. Das konstruktivistische Filmplakat der zwanziger Jahre», in: Wolfgang Beilenhoff, Martin Heller (Hg.), Das Filmplakat, Zürich 1995, S. 90–120

Image creditso

Plakat, Zakon i Dolg – Amok (Originalfilmtitel: Amoki), 1927, Sowjetunion, Gestaltung: Nikolaj Petrovič Prusakov, Grigorij Il’ič Borisov
Abbildung: Museum für Gestaltung Zürich / ZHdK

Plakat, Pervaja i poslednjaja, 1926, Sowjetunion, Gestaltung: Nikolaj Petrovič Prusakov, Grigorij Il’ič Borisov
Abbildung: Museum für Gestaltung Zürich / ZHdK

Plakat, Kino-roman «Predatel’», 1926, Sowjetunion, Gestaltung: Anton Michajilovič Lavinskij
Abbildung: Museum für Gestaltung Zürich / ZHdK

Plakat, Čelovek s kinoapparatom, 1929, Sowjetunion, Gestaltung: Georgij Avgustovič Stenberg, Vladimir Avgustovič Stenberg
Abbildung: Museum für Gestaltung Zürich / ZHdK